Category Archives: World Streets

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Equidade/Transporte: Ver das favelas de Nairobi

* Para a tradução Português clique em Traduzir no menu superior.

We present this here as one of a series of postings which are intended to serve as food for thought and broader background on our topic as lived and seen from different angles and environments around the world, as we move ahead on the key cooperative program in Helsinki. Continuar a ler

Equity-Based Transportation Planning, Policy and Practice: First Helsinki project announcement

* Para a tradução Português clique em Traduzir no menu superior.
This week we initiate work on the first stages of preparatory organization in support of an “open conversation” looking into the pros and cons, the possibilities and eventual impossibilities,  of creating an equity-based transportation system at the level of a city and the surrounding region.  This first pioneering project, in which we hope will become a series of leading world city projects building on this first example, is being carried out under the leadership of  the Helsinki Department of City Planning and Transportation, and is running over the period mi-February through mid-April.

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SLOWTH: Or why it is so very important (and so very easy) to slow down traffic in cities

SLOWTH: Or why it is so very important (and so very easy) to slow down traffic in cities It is the consistent position of this journal that much of what is wrong with our current transportation arrangements in cities could be greatly alleviated if we can find ways just to slow down. It is very powerful — and it’s just not that hard to do.  Get comfortable and have a look. On “slowth”: The use of a strange not to say rather ugly word like “slowth” in an attempt to draw attention to the importance of slowing traffic in cities, and why … Read More

via World Streets: A New Mobility Agenda

Bike-Sharing: 2011 State of the European Union report

Bike-Sharing: 2011 State of the European Union report As regular readers of World Streets by now know well, we consider bicycles as the mine canaries of sustainable transport and sustainable cities. When you can hear them singing, everything is going pretty much in the right direction. But silence or absence, and hey you are in deep trouble. As part of our long-term watching brief under our free-for-all World City Bike Collaborative since 2005, we try to keep track of what is going on both at the le … Read More

via World Streets: The New Mobility Agenda

Going down? Newman and Kenworthy on Peak Car Use

Going down? Newman and Kenworthy on Peak Car Use This is an important article. It  appears simultaneously in the Summer of 2011 edition of our sister publication, the Journal of World Transport Policy and Practice. With a view to ensuring its broadest international readership we are posting it here with pleasure, and with permission of the authors. We do this with particular interest on the grounds that their central thesis — that is, our faster than one might have expected evolving attitudes … Read More

via World Streets: The New Mobility Agenda

Women2Drive: A Day to be remembered in The Kingdom and beyond.

Women2Drive: A Day to be remembered in The Kingdom and beyond. It is a rare day that World Streets comes out in favor of cars in cities. But even that of course is not quite true. At best there will be plenty of cars in our cities, but they will not be parked and they will be chauffeuring not just their drivers but offering affordable services to flexible groups of people safely and efficiently. Great way to get around when you get it right. And getting it right is the theme of the day today in the Kingdom o … Read More

via World Streets: The New Mobility Agenda

What about using our heads (for a change)?

What about using our heads (for a change)? At the end of the day our transport sector, no matter where it is, is shaped by the perceptions of the main players, the opportunists, planners, decision makers and the public of what is there and what is it that people want and need. And if it is a mess in your country or city,well that’s because these perceptions are simply not clear enough. Read what Nate Sliver of the New York Times has to say when there is a collision between the experts and common sense on one much discussed transportation topic. Interesting things happen when smart people from the outside poke their noses into the transportation box. As we say: “you never know where the next good idea is going to come from” Read More

via World Streets: The New Mobility Agenda

Peter Newman: No room left for the car

Peter Newman: No room left for the car Australian environmental activist and professor of sustainability at Curtin University in Perth, Peter Newman loves Indian streets. He shares his experience of Indian cities with Arushi Mittal. (Courtesy: Iclei World Congress) What are your observations about Indian cities?) I come from a school of thought that likes cities, and I find an Indian street fascinating. There are so many different users: bullock carts, food vendors, beggars, cyclists … Read More

World Streets This Week: Edition of 2 May 2011

World Streets This Week: Edition of 2 May 2011 – – – > Click here to download Weekly Edition of 2 May 2011  Another busy week on World Streets, with contributions coming in from the StreetFilms media group in  New York on parking strategies, on city cycling and empowerment of women in Dhaka, and on to the pressing matter of rethinking the finances of our entire operation so that we can continue to act as the world's only fully independent, collaborative, worldwide sustainable transport dai … Read More

via World Streets (Time out while we regroup)

City as a time capsule: Urban highway construction mania still booming in 2011

[Clique aquii para a tradução automática do artigo em Português]

City as a time capsule: Urban highway construction mania still booming in 2011 Transport planning and policy in Lahore Pakistan today, as reported by public policy consultant Hassaan Ghazali, looks like something that was dragged out of a moss-covered time capsule on a hot day: a tawdry reminder of the kind of old mobility thinking, interest-wrangling and mindless investments of hard-earned taxpayer money that challenged and in many cases helped destroy the urban fabric of cities across North America and in many other parts of the world half a century ago.…

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